ASIA I. Province – II. Diocese

ASIA I. Province – II. Diocese. I. Province. The province of Asia, created on the territory of the old kingdom of the Attalids, included Hither Asia to the border of Bithynia in the N and Lycia in the S, and to Galatia and the mountains of Pisidia in the E; it included Rhodes and the other small Aegean islands. Greek colonization went as far as the lower valleys of the major rivers, Hermus and Maeander; the dynasties that succeeded Alexander founded or refounded centers in the interior. The first organization of 129 BC gave way to the Sullan constitution of 84 BC, which divided Asia into 44 districts. Under Augustus the province was governed by a proconsul, ordinarily for one year. The entire province was represented in a concilium koinon, which organized the imperial cult. With more urban centers than any other province in the empire most of them predating Roman rule only a few were founded by Tiberius and Hadrian its prosperity was based on the general prosperity of numerous modest-sized cities, often divided by municipal rivalries. The title of provincial metropolis belonged to Pergamum but from the beginning was held by Ephesus, seat of the governor, although he traveled to the various centers for administration. Smyrna, Sardis and Cyzicus vied with Ephesus: some orations of the 2nd-c. rhetor of Prusa in Bithynia Dione, called Chrysostom, deride these rivalries, which were an object of scorn to the Romans, who often profited from quarrels between cities to consolidate their own power at the expense of local autonomy. At the end of the 3rd c. Diocletian divided Asia into seven smaller provinces: Asia Proconsularis capital: Ephesus, Hellespont Cyzicus, Lydia Sardis, Phrygia I Laodicea, Phrygia II Eukarpia, Caria Aphrodisia and Insularum provincia with 53 islands. II. Diocese. Diocletian’s reorganization of the Roman provincial structure created smaller territorial units and divided the provinces among five dioceses: Asia, Pontus, Thrace, the East and Egypt. Following the decision at the Council of Constantinople of 381, these essentially bureaucratic and administrative divisions were recognized as ecclesiastical boundaries, superimposed on the old division of episcopal sees by province. The council also sanctioned Constantinople’s hierarchical supremacy over the other metropolises, ensuring that the dioceses of Asia and Pontus would be subordinated to that of Thrace. The civil capital of the diocese of Asia remained at Ephesus, the capital of the old province, which now also exercised ecclesiastical jurisdiction over the territory of 11 provinces: Asia I and II, Caria, Lycia, Pamphylia I and II, Lydia, Hellespont, Bithynia and Phrygia I and II. But, however important, Ephesus was not a powerful enough center of church life to be able to oppose Constantinople; while Caesarea, already capital of Cappadocia and now seat of the vicar of the diocese of Pontus, was not geographically central and suffered competition from Ancyra, as well as from Chalcedon, Nicomedia and Nicaea, all naturally favored by their closeness to the court. The Council of Chalcedon of 451 sanctioned a similar subordination of the dioceses of Asia and Pontus to that of Thrace: can. 28 established that the metropolitans of Asia and Pontus, together with the bishops of their provinces, should ordain local bishops, but the metropolitans themselves should be ordained by the bishop of Constantinople. The various regions of the province and diocese of Asia were the first parts of the Roman Empire to be Christianized, from the time of the apostles; the process of evangelization was varied, however, complicated by the extreme variety of peoples, traditions, greater or lesser degree of Hellenization, and social and political differences: there was an enormous difference, e.g., between urban Christianity in thoroughly Hellenized cities with a lively cultural and social life and that in the rural areas of the interior think of Phrygia. Christian origins must therefore be sought and verified from case to case according to specific local situations.Diocese of Asia – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia travelquaz

ASIA I. Province - II. Diocese

Diocese of Pontus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia travelquaz

ASIA I. Province - II. Diocese

Roman province – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia travelquaz

ASIA I. Province - II. Diocese

Asia (Roman province) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia travelquaz

ASIA I. Province - II. Diocese

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