APOSTOLIC TRADITION

APOSTOLIC TRADITION. Preserved partially in Latin, Sahidic and Bohairic Coptic, Ethiopian and Arabic, and some fragments in Greek, from which the original text must be reconstructed, this church order has been widely regarded, starting from the beginning of the 20th c., as a work composed by Hippolytus. On that basis it has had a heavy influence on the 20th-c. liturgical reforms. After a brief preface, in which the author affirms that the purpose of the work is that of supporting the tradition in response to what the author perceived as the ignorance of those who were leading the churches, the document proceeds with the descriptions of the rules for the elections and the ordination of a bishop including the anaphora that the bishop might recite at his ordination, with prayers for the offering of other foods in addition to bread and wine, for the election and ordination of presbyters, deacons and other offices. Afterward, the rules for the rites of initiation are described, from the initial selection of the catechumens to the communion of the newly baptized. And last there is a collection of material that governs the various aspects of religious ministry, ritual meals, private prayer and study, and the provision and administration of a cemetery. The attribution of the work to Hippolytus has been rigorously questioned of late, and most recently Bradshaw and others, who, though recognizing the possibility of a nucleus in the work that dates back to 2nd-c. Rome, posit that the document was widely interpolated in the 4th c. Stewart-Sykes, however, building on the work of Brent, has reaffirmed the traditional attribution in a more nuanced way, suggesting that the redactional effort that the document appears to have undergone took place within the context of Hippolytus’s school. He maintains that an ancient Roman order, which contained instructions on baptism and ritual meals, was expanded with the addition at the beginning of directions on ordinations, with other interpolated material on prayer and instruction in the section pertaining to ritual meals, and that this text was further expanded when the school of Hippolytus united with other Roman Christian communities before the death of Pope Pontianus. In any case the work is living literature and should not be uncritically considered a description of the 3rd-c. Roman liturgy. If Brent and Stewart-Sykes are correct, however, it is nonetheless a vital document for understanding the emergence of the Roman episcopate in the late 2nd and early 3rd c., in that between the lines of the work the establishment of a monepiscopate may be recognized, with the consequent redefinition of the role of a presbyter from that of patronage to that of teaching under the authority of the bishop. At the same time, due to the use of an ancient Grundschrift, the work may be seen to contain liturgical information of an antiquity even greater than that imagined before. Editions: SC 11bis; B. Botte, La Tradition apostolique de saint Hippolyte: essai de reconstitution, M¼nster 1963. Studies: E. Jungklaus, Die Gemeinde Hippolyts, TU 46.2; Leipzig 1928; G. Horner, The Statutes of the Apostles, London 1904; H. Duensing, Der aethiopische Text der Kirchenordnung des Hippolyt, Gttingen 1946; W. Till – J. Leipoldt, Der koptische Text der Kirchenordnung Hippolyts, TU 58, Berlin 1954; J.M. Hanssens, La liturgie d’Hippolyte. Ses documents, son titulaire, ses origines et son caract¨re: OCA 155, Rome 1959; E. Tidner, Didascaliae apostolorum, canonum ecclesiasticorum, traditionis apostolicae versiones Latinae, TU 75, Berlin 1963; G. Dix H. Chadwick rev., The Treatise on the Apostolic Tradition of St. Hippolytus of Rome, Ridgefield, CT 1968; R. Tateo, Ippolito di Roma: Tradizione Apostolica, Rome 1972; P. Nautin, Patristique et histoire des dogmes: AEHE, Ve  sect. 86 1977-78 33-35; J. Magne, Tradition apostolique sur les charismes et Diataxeis des saints ap´tres, Paris 1975; E. Mazza, Omilie pasquali e Birkat ha-Mazon: fonti dell’Anafora di Ippolito?: EphLit 97 1983 409- 481; A. Stewart-Sykes, Hippolytus on the Apostolic Tradition: An English Version with Introduction and Commentary, Crestwood, NY 2001 bibl.; P.F. Bradshaw et al., The Apostolic Tradition: A Commentary, Minneapolis 2002 bibl..Tradition and traditions by Archimandrite Barnabas Lambropoulos … travelquaz

APOSTOLIC TRADITION Photo Gallery




APOSTOLIC TRADITION

Why Apostolic Tradition Matters – 2 – St. Barnabas Orthodox Church travelquaz

APOSTOLIC TRADITION

Sacred Tradition (Apostolic Tradition) in the Bible & Early Church … travelquaz

APOSTOLIC TRADITION

Pharsea: Old and New. travelquaz

APOSTOLIC TRADITION

Maybe You Like Them Too

Leave a Reply

− 3 = 2