ANONYMOUS APOLLINARIST TEXTS

ANONYMOUS APOLLINARIST TEXTS Early in the 5th c. various writings originating in Apollinarist circles circulated under the name of Pope Julius I 6 Feb. 33712 Apr. 352. Leontius of Byzantium gives information on these, Adv. fraudes Apoll., proem.: PG 86, 1948B. The problem of these counterfeits has been studied by H. Lietzmann, Apollinaris von Laodicea und seine Schule, Tübingen 1904, 158-163. In particular, no author has been suggested for a text in the form of an encyclical letter, preserved in the Greek text, a Syriac version, a Latin fragment corresponding almost completely to the Greek text, an Arabic fragment and some Armenian fragments. A critical edition of the Greek text of this encyclion among the works of Julius I: PL 8, 876 A-B is in H. Lietzmann, 292-293; for the textual tradition, see ibid., 158. For the editions of the fragments in other languages, see CPG II, 3735. Besides the encyclion, also indicated as anonymous, are a series of texts of disputed attribution CPG II, 3736-3740, as well as a certain number of fragments: 185 Syriac; 186 Latin, Syriac, Armenian; 187 Syriac and 188-191 Arabic, in the numbering of Lietzmann’s collection: J. Fleming – H. Lietzmann, Apollinaristische Schriften. Syrisch mit den griechischen Texten AGG, N.F. 7,4, Berlin 1904. In addition to Lietzmann’s work and the CPG, see DTC VIII, 2, 1917; E. Schwartz, Codex Vaticanus gr. 1431, eine antichalkedonische Sammlung aus der Zeit Kaiser Zenos, in Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Philosophischphilologische und historische Klasse, XXXII B., 6 Abhandlung, Munich 1927, 8, 96; CPG II, 3735-3741. E. Cavalcanti ANONYMOUS ARIANS 1:138 ANONYMOUS ARIANS. Under this rubric CPG II, 2080-2085 lists the following works: 1 n. 2080: Pseudo-Athanasian Homily ed. Scheidweier, ZKG 67 1955-56 132-140 on the deceptions of the devil, who inspires false and idolatrous cults. The conclusion has been seen as subordinationist, hence the Arian attribution, but the text at that place is in too bad a state to allow sure conclusions. The homily appears to have been written first half 4th c. 2 n. 2081: anonymous homily ed. Amand-Moons, RBen 63 1953 18-69; 211-238 on virginity, addressed to fathers of families, that they would bring up their children to this ideal. Has seemed Arian due to the lack of trinitarian and Nicene ideas, but the argument is insubstantial, and all the more so if, with Vööbus OC 40 1956 69-77, we consider the Greek text a translation of a 4th-c. Syriac original. 3 nn. 2082.2083: two pseudo-Chrysostomic homilies ed. Libaert, SC 146 by an unknown Arian author, preached during the octave of Easter, respectively on Act 2:22-24 and 4:5-10. They are later than 431, since the author knows of Nestorius’s heresy Libaert groundlessly considers this passage an interpolation. 4 n. 2084: anonymous homily ed. Leroy, Epektasis. Mlanges J. Danilou, Paris 1972, 343-353 on the annunciation Lk 1:31-44. The author, who openly attacks Marcellus of Ancyra, offers a trinitarian doctrinal approach resembling that of the Antiochene formula of 341: he is thus antiNicene, though not necessarily Arian. 5 n. 2085: fragments from an unknown Arian historian are taken from Theophanes’s Chronicon paschale and elsewhere, which continued Eusebius of Caesarea’s Chronicle until the death of Valens ed. Bidez, GCS, Philostorgius, CLI-CLXIII; 202-241. CPG 2, 2080-2085 with bibl.; M. Simonetti, Note su due omelie ariane pubblicate recentemente, in Studi in onore di Q. Cataudella, II, Catania 1972, 417-423. M. Simonetti ANONYMOUS GALLUS 5th-6th c.. Disciple of Faustus of Riez, perhaps an abbot of SW Gaul ca. 500. Postulated by O. Seebass as the author of most of the 17 Instructiones PL 80, 229-260, previously attributed to Colombanus, though some go back to Faustus himself. G. Morin later noticed a strong similarity of expression between the Instructiones attributed to the Anonymous Gallus and two fragments contained in ms 0 212 Sup. Ambrosianus, concluding that the author was the same. The two fragments are a sermon for the ascension and a succinct exposition of the mystery of the Trinity. CPL 978; G. Morin, Deux pièces indites du disciple de Fauste de Riez auteur des soi-disant Instructiones Columbani: Revue Charlemagne I 1881 161-170. E. Prinzivalli ANONYMOUS of VERONA. 11 homilies go by this name, written probably at Verona mid-6th c. 10 homilies are contained in the Codex Veronensis LIX 57 and are attributed either to ps.-Augustine serm. 118, 237-239, Mai 171-173 or ps.-Maximus of Turin tractatus 3 de baptismo. The eleventh homily is identical to ps.-Augustine’s Sermo 109. The homilies appear to have been written by a well-educated, pastorally zealous preacher; they address the baptismal creed, baptismal rites, repentance, the judgment of the dead, the mystery of Christmas and 2 Cor 5:10. CPL 222. 368 s 109. 809; CPPM I A, 894. 903. 1022-1024. 1117- 1119. 1780-1782; C. Lambot, Le florilège augustinien de Vrone: RB 79 1969 70-81; J.P. Bouhot, Note sur trois Sermons anonymes: REAug 20 1974 135-142; G. Sobrero, Anonimo Veronese: omelie mistagogiche e catechetiche: Bibliotheca Ephemerides Liturgicae, Collectio Subsidia 66 1992 85-155; H.J.Iconoclasm – Wikiwand travelquaz

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