ANOMOIANS – ANOMOIANISM

ANOMOIANS ANOMOIANISM Anomoeans – Anomoeanism. After an interval of approximately 30 years 325355 following the condemnation pronounced at the Council of Nicaea during which the supporters and followers of Arius left off the most radical propositions of their teacher’s doctrine in favor of more or less moderate formulations, those propositions were taken up again and systematically developed, beginning ca. 355, first by Aetius and then esp. by Eunomius of Cyzicus; with their followers, they were immediately dubbed anomoians by their adversaries, since they considered the Son to be unlike anomoios the Father, an affirmation that in fact does not appear in the anomoian texts that have reached us but can be deduced from their doctrine. The doctrine affirms the absolute transcendence of the Father, whose qualifying attribute is that of alone being ungenerated; the Son, therefore, as generated, is different from the Father by hypostasis and substance, and inferior to him, not existing ab aeterno like him. Rejecting Arius’s most scandalous statement, Eunomius said that the Son was not created from nothing but, by the will of the one who made him, is the only generated being created directly from the Father, to be his minister in the creation of the world, which he carried out by the Father’s will. The Son participates in the Father’s prerogatives, perfections, light, life and power, but at a subordinate level, since the Father is ungenerated light, life and power, whereas the Son is generated light, life and power. He can therefore be considered like the Father only in operation and not in substance. While the Son is God, though at an inferior level vis- -vis the perfect divinity of the Father, Eunomius denies this status to the Holy Spirit, which he considers to be only the most sublime of the creatures created by the Son according to the Father’s will. Given that the three divine hypostases are not only subordinate one to the other but also different in substance = nature, the concept of the divine Trinity is essentially foreign to Eunomius, and it is not by chance that this term does not appear in his writings. His followers, therefore, who were divided into various conventicles, baptized not in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, but in the name of the Lord. M. Albentz, Zur Geschichte der jung arianischen Kirchengemeinschaft: Theologische Studien und Kritiken 82 1909 205- 278; J. de Ghellinck, Quelques apprciations de la dialectique d’Aristote durant les conflicts trinitaires du IVe si¨cle: RHE 26 1930 5-42; Simonetti 584; L.R. Wickham, The Syntagmation of Aetius the Anomean: JTS NS 19 1968 532-569; T.A. Kopecek, A History of Neo-Arianism, Cambridge, MA 1979, vol. I; H.C. Brennecke, Studien zur Geschichte der Homer, T¼bingen 1988, passim; R.P.C. Hanson, The Search for the Christian Doctrine of God: The Arian Controversy, 318381, Edinburgh 1988; M.R. Barnes – D.H. Williams eds., Arianism after Arius: Essays on the Development of the Fourth Century Trinitarian Conflict, Edinburgh 1993; R.P. Vaggione, Eunomius of Cyzicus and the Nicene Revolution, Oxford 2000.St Basil the Great: Homily Against the Sabellians et Alios (part 2 … travelquaz

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ANOMOIANS ANOMOIANISM

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