American Culture

Much of the city dwellers’ time was filled with work. They did, however, enjoy other amusements and entertainment. The majority of townsfolk considered church to be their primary social and cultural outlet. The church dominated life in Boston and Philadelphia, and, in Charles Town, the elite turned church attendance into an elaborate social event filled with cultural meaning and significance. Townsfolk also pursued other cultural outlets, most of which they brought with them from their homeland. Gaming and card playing as well as dancing, singing, and fidling proved quite popular in colonial cities. Young boys also played a kind of football or soccer in city streets. The town’s wealthier inhabitants enjoyed country excursions, elaborate dinner parties, and lectures provided by distinguished speakers. In Newport, village men amused themselves by bowling on the green, hunting wildfowl, and fishing. New Amsterdam’s (New York) elite engaged in boat racing and a popular form of miniature golf, among other amusements. Townsfolk also passed the time smoking tobacco and drinking alcohol, although these were officially discouraged, if not outright condemned, by most colonial leaders. Virtually all townsfolk celebrated important holidays such as New Year’s Day, May Day, and Christmas. Most town leaders valued education and worked to create both public and private schools in their towns. Boston led the colonial cities in the creation of schools, but it was not the only city with schools. New Amsterdam created the first elementary school in any colonial town in 1638, and, within a year of its founding, Newport’s leaders also had made provision for a school. Charles Town, too, established schools, but not until the eighteenth century. Although the Society of Friends in Philadelphia remained somewhat indifferent to higher education, it was noticeably active in creating elementary schools; Philadelphia also had an excellent public library system, founded in large part by Benjamin Franklin, who also created the American Philosophical Society in 1743. Of the four Northern towns, Boston and Philadelphia rapidly became centers of education, attracting students from the city and the surrounding countryside, as well as other English colonies. Colonial cities also enjoyed a vibrant print culture. In 1638, the first printing press in the North American colonies was set up just outside Boston, in Cambridge. John Foster became the proprietor of the first Boston press in 1674. Printing began in Philadelphia in 1685. Soon, other presses emerged, printing everything from collections of poems and essays to sermons, pamphlets, and almanacs. America is the acceptable face of cultural imperialism – Telegraph travelquaz

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American Culture

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American Culture

Mass shootings have become part of American culture travelquaz

American Culture

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