America Wars of Expansion

America Wars of Expansion In the wars to expand British settlement beyond the first frontiers of southern New England and the Virginia Tidewater, British Americans embraced both the first way of war and Native American allies. During the Tuscarora War (1711–1715) in North Carolina, British rangers and tributary Catawba waged a war of extermination and enslavement on the Iroquoian Tuscarora. The English thoroughly pummeled the Tuscarora and drove them to seek protection from their cousins in New York, where they became the sixth member of the Iroquois League. A similar chain of events transpired in South Carolina during the Yamasee War (1715–1717). Ironically, the Yamasee had helped the English defeat the Tuscarora. The English, now aided by Covenant Chain Iroquois, crushed the Yamasee and thereby opened much of South Carolina to slave-based plantation agriculture. In New England, in Dummer’s War (1724–1725) also known as Father Râle’s War, Lovewell’s War, and Gray Lock’s War British-American rangers roamed the Maine frontier, seeking Abenaki men, women, and children to scalp.

The events of the war included the English destruction of the Abenaki village at Norridgewock and the death of Captain John Lovewell, a British ranger who had made a small fortune cashing in on scalp bounties. The wars to expand British settlement saw both the creation of “new” and the strengthening of “old” European-Native American alliances. The English, in the Catawba and Savannah, found trusted allies, who would help protect the southern frontier from the encroachments of other native peoples (Cherokee and Creek) and Europeans (Spaniards and Frenchmen), as well as become partners in expanding the native slave trade. The Catawba became the most trusted of the southern tribes and prospered in a “New World” of British domination. The Yamasee, driven from Carolina, fled to Florida, where they allied themselves with the Spanish. In return for Spanish protection, the Yamasee served as a buffer against British advances southward from Charles Town. In the North, the French redoubled their commitment to their allies. They understood that the protection of Canada depended on maintenance of the good relations with native peoples, and, in the 1720s and 1730s, they built more Jesuit missions among Native Americans. By the 1740s, a well-developed system of alliances and pacts had been created in North America.

History: Westward Expansion and the Old West for Kids

feeling of guilt over our participation in the mexican american war

Map of the Expansion of the United States 1783–1812

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